clock menu more-arrow no yes

Filed under:

Only D'Juan Brown Days Until USF Football

This former #42 wasn't a big star in the USF secondary, but he played a sizable role helping USF transition from an FBS independent to a BCS conference.

D'Juan Brown in action in 2003.
D'Juan Brown in action in 2003.
2004 USF Football Media Guide

#42 CB D'Juan Brown
2002-2005, 5'11", 175 lbs.

Career Stats: In his four years at USF, D'Juan appeared in 41 games, starting in 20. Brown racked up 128 tackles, 2.5 TFL, three interceptions, and 21 pass breakups. He was never the big star in the USF secondary. First it was safeties J.R. Reed and Danny Verpaele grabbing the spotlight, and then by his senior year, future NFL draft picks Mike Jenkins and Trae Williams had locked down the starting cornerback spots. But Brown was a big contributor throughout his USF career.

How He Came To USF: D'Juan played at Glades Central High School in Belle Glade, Florida. He was part of a dynasty, winning three straight state titles with the Raiders and finishing his high school career on a 35-game winning streak. He was a Class 3A all-state second team player in 2000, his senior year. Brown was part of USF's 2001 recruiting class.

Recruiting Rankings: There may have been rankings back then, but they don't go back that far online.

His Best Game: Tough to decide between his game against Southern Miss in 2002 and Memphis in 2003. In the 16-13 win over the Golden Eagles, Brown had a career-high nine tackles, including two TFL. In the 21-16 victory over the Tigers the next year, Brown broke up three passes and was Johnny on the spot to make a recovery when J.R. Reed's second interception of the game was fumbled. Honorable mention to a game against Cincinnati in 2005, when Brown jumped in to intercept a poor throw and returned it 26 yards for a touchdown.

Fun Fact: Glades Central has a long list of pro football products, including Fred Taylor, Kelvin Benjamin, Santonio Holmes, and Jessie Hester (father of USF's Jessie). Hester coached Glades Central for three years and was fired after "only" going 36-4 and reaching two state title games.